Aalto fans. Sunday in Paimio and around.

Architecture, Blogroll, Finland, Picture a day, Traveling, Turku

Paimio is an insignificant village close to Salo (near Turku), but it is where you find another architecture pearl by Alvar Aalto: the former tuberculosis sanatorium. Apparently before the ATBs were used in fighting tuberculosis in the 1950s, people had been often sent to these, errr, sanatoriums where they were treated with fresh air, high hygiene standards, fresh colours and proper food. Every third patient did not quite make it, but hey, it was a way to stop the disease from spreading at least.

Nevertheless, the sanatorium made Aalto famous abroad – functionalism at its best, practical AND pretty. Oh and the atmosphere is stunning.  I could not stop thinking that there is TB bacteria hiding somewhere.

But in fact after the scientist found more efficient ways to defeat TB, the sanatorium was used as a “normal” hospital for 40 years since the 1970s. The hospital closed a few year ago and parts of it have been rented by MLL afterwards. Some activities take place in some parts of the sanatorium during the weekedays, which means that the hospital at the weekend – when the guided tours take place – feels superempty and exciting.

Well, havea look for yourself.

MIU_6163MIU_6093MIU_6159

Fresh pine-scented air and sun – sounds legit.MIU_6146MIU_6143

Aalto waves, fresh, bright colours, absence of corners for hygiene reasons.MIU_6138MIU_6122MIU_6118MIU_6092

The 1970s meet Aalto.MIU_6131

Aaltos none functioning tile stove – a slight design fail 😉 the smoke does not really sink down, does it…MIU_6100

Hygienic lights. Chapel and social room in one.MIU_6112

FreE toilet boot and a smart door handle which won’t catch your sleeve.MIU_6114

Sophisticated ventilation.MIU_6129

Spitter and “silent” hand sinks.MIU_6155MIU_6140

Young scared birdy in the garden… we let her be.MIU_6165

Alvar Aalto’s House.

Blogroll, Helsinki, Picture a day

… for those who are interested in Aalto´s architecture, do take a look at my recent blog post on Helsinki100 – I visited his house in Munkkiniemi. It was surprisingly cosy. The best moment was taking a peek on the balcony. The guide opened the doors, I took a step outside, had a look and took one more step… and suddenly got blown by icecold wind and pseudosnow. Bless my 38°C mascara.

Lahti.

Blogroll, Finland, Likes, Traveling

Last week I received a free hug from a random guy (offering free hugs on one of the busiest squares in Helsinki). Of course I had to try it out, and, oh my, such a little gesture and it changed the whole day for me. It stopped my ever-stressing train of thought and calmed me down. Random acts of kindness work and are appreciated. If I were see the guy again, he is so much ending on this blog!

So, the weekend: yesterday we did some tree planting. Yes. We were renewing the local forest in rain under the supervision of (again, local branch of) Lions. It might be the age (I know, I’m either babbling about my age or the weather), but I really missed direct contact with earth and plants and such – hah, in no time you will find me digging in the ground all weekends! (Not.)

And Sunday was another museum day for us, this time we chose Orimattila and Lahti; a more thorough report will follow on my Museokortti blog. I never thought that Lahti was a lovely place, and well, it is not. Today is Whitsun, people should be doing something together, visiting weddings, eating out, sitting in the church – well no, Lahti centre was almost deserted and the only people to be seen were teenagers sipping on cheap canned beer and a bunch of lost souls.

Even so more I was surprised to find out that Lahti’s “main” church was designed by Alvar Aalto. It was open and completely empty – well why not, at least nobody was walking into my shots. Clean, simple, white – yet definitely not sterile or cold. I might have uttered something like “what a waste of a church for this place”, but I did not actually mean it. Of course.

In the line with Aalto’s angles and waves we continued to the ski-jump bridge area. The training bridges were somehow cute compared to the 170m tall monsters… Sadly the viewing tower (the actual main ski-jump bridge) only opens in a few weeks, but, errr, I think the view was lovely as it was.

Are ski-jumpers completely mad?

Seems so.